Peace, love, and tea

FAQ

› What is the teaposy difference?
› What do blooming teas taste like?
› What are the nutritional values of your blooming teas?
› Do your teas contain caffeine?
› Are your teas gluten free?
› Do your teas contain nuts?
› Could you tell me more about how the teaposy ingredients are grown and harvested, in terms of organic standards or pesticide/herbicide use?
› How do I properly brew a blooming tea?
› How many cups can I make from 1 teaposy blooming tea?
› Can I save the tea if I cannot finish it?
› Can I make iced teas from teaposy teas?
› Can I keep the posy flower after I am done with my tea?
› Do I need the tea warmer?
› How are teaposy blooming teas made?
› What are the employment conditions for the tea farmers/teaposy assemblers?
› Is blooming tea a traditional part of ancient eastern cultures?

What is the teaposy difference?
Teaposy blooming teas are made with highest grade of rare silver needle white tea leaves. We work directly with tea farms and factories. Over 80% of our tea leaves are select spring harvest, the highest quality of the year. We scent our teas only with natural jasmine flowers. No artificial flavors are used. We submit the raw materials harvested and final finished products to reputable labs for testing and inspection to ensure our products meet world class standards. Our factory holds 8 blooming tea design patents in China.  go to top

What do blooming teas taste like?
Our white blooming teas are made from the finest silver needle white tea and lightly scented with fresh jasmine flowers. A sip of these remarkable teas reveals a subtle jasmine aroma and a lingering pure, sweet finish, but this is where the likeness ends... Each teaposy bloom is crafted with a different type of flower, infusing it with distinct tea qualities found only in nature.

Medley Noir is the black tea version of our blooming teas collection, made with the black silver needle teas buds. They will remind you of the familiar rich taste found in fine English afternoons, only milder. The lasting floral aromas released from the blooms hearken to the flower fields of the countryside.  go to top

What are the nutritional values of your blooming teas?
Teaposy blooming teas are fat free, protein free, carbohydrate free, and thus have no calories. They contain high levels of polyphenol, an antioxidant that has been proven to reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease and cancer.  go to top

Do your teas contain caffeine?
Our teas are not decaffeinated. Our Sonata and Symphony teas are all-herbal teas and are naturally caffeine free. Our white tea based blooming teas contain very low caffeine, as white teas are known to have the lowest caffeine content among all caffeinated teas or coffee drinks. A cup of white tea contains an average of 8-15mg caffeine while a cup of coffee provides 60-120mg. The Medley Noir teas have a caffeine content similar to that of other black teas.

It is worth noting that whereas the caffeine in coffee is absorbed rapidly into the body, thus stimulating an immediate increase in blood circulation and cardiovascular activity, the polyphenols in tea are thought to slow down the rate of absorption. The effects of the caffeine are felt more slowly but remain in the body longer, thus making tea a refreshing and revitalizing beverage.  go to top

Are your teas gluten free?
Our blooming teas are gluten free. The factory location does not produce products besides blooming teas. The teas are scented with fresh jasmine flowers of the season.

One of our concert teas (Symphony) contains barley. Our concert teas are produced in a different location.  go to top

Do your teas contain nuts?
The Let It Snow blooming tea contains coconut fruit fiber. No other teas in our collection contain any form of nut. Let It Snow is a special design of our blooming teas; we sell them only in their own packaging or in the Snow Dance gift set. They are not included in any of our mixed packs such as Medley, Quartet or Medley Noir.  go to top

Could you tell me more about how the teaposy ingredients are grown and harvested, in terms of organic standards or pesticide/herbicide use?
Our products are not certified organic. It is very expensive to go through the certification process, not to mention the high cost for the maintenance of the certificate after it is acquired; however, we have been exporting to Europe for 4 years. For us to be able to export to the EU, we have to pass very strict pesticides-residual-free testing. The testing standard is even more strict in Germany than the rest of EU. We partnership strictly with only one tea farm/factory who owns silver needle tea farms and jasmine gardens, and has implemented an excellent quality control process. We obtain herbal flowers from steady suppliers from other regions of China. We run testing on raw materials before production to ensure they meet EU pesticides-residual-free testing requirements. We then go through a proprietary process on the flowers (gentle steaming/dry) for further cleaning before starting the crafting process. After the teas are crafted, they are scented with the fresh jasmine flower (no natural or artificial flavorings are used at all). The whole process includes several drying procedures, and the final products undergo UV light treatment before packaging.  go to top

How do I properly brew a blooming tea?
The blooming teas are tied very tightly, so water heated to boiling is essential for them to bloom properly. Use a heat resistant glass teapot with a relatively wide base to enjoy the experience. It takes a minute or two for a teaposy to bloom in boiling hot water; however, each one has a unique character, and some of them may take longer. If the water is not hot enough, it can also take a bit more time. Remember, this is a good opportunity for patience and to have a moment for yourself. :-)

Once the tea reaches full bloom, it is ready for your first cup of tea, which offers a stronger aroma with a light flavor.

Keep adding hot water gently to the pot, and take your time. Avoid pouring water directly on top of the already blossomed flower, but rather pour along the side of the pot. Flavor gradually increases as aroma decreases with each following cup. You may be surprised how many cups of tea one teaposy can offer you and your friends.  go to top

How many cups can I make from 1 teaposy blooming tea?
You can get 4 to 6 pots (~80oz) of tea out of 1 teaposy blooming tea by continuing to add hot water gently to your pot. Silver needle teas are known to be slow-brewing teas. Your patience along with a tea warmer may bring you even more cups.  go to top

Can I save the tea if I cannot finish it?
We do not recommend leaving unfinished tea with leaves overnight. You may consider pouring the tea into a container and saving it in the refrigerator for iced tea, or to warm it up the next day for hot tea.  go to top

Can I make iced teas from teaposy teas?
Yes. Iced teaposy teas are surprisingly good and refreshing. Please try making some . We have been told by customers that the Sonata and Symphony teas from the posy concert series are exceptionally good when made into iced teas.

To make iced posy concert teas: Steep one tea bag in a 12 oz cup or pot with hot water, wait for several minutes until the tea reaches the desired strength, and then pour the tea liquor into your favorite cup filled with ice. Enjoy. The Sonata tea from this tea series is naturally sweetened by sweet leaves from the ingredients.

To make iced posy blooming teas: Brew the tea as described in "how do I properly brew a blooming tea?", then pour each pot of tea brewed into a small pitcher filled with ice. Please do not forget that you can get ~80oz or more of refreshing tea drinks from a single blooming tea bulb.  go to top

Can I keep the posy flower after I am done with my tea?
Yes, you can keep your teaposy blooming tea flower in a glass container with cold water to display and enjoy the blossom for a few more days. Avoid pouring water directly on top of the blossomed flower, but gently pour along the side of the container. This way your flower can stay as intact as possible. If you change water from time to time, the blossom may last for weeks.  go to top

Do I need the tea warmer?
It is not required, although it is a nice way to stay cozy. Use a teaposy warmer to warm your tea and to accentuate its flower power.  go to top

How are teaposy blooming teas made?
Hand picked in spring, the outer leaves are plucked, leaving only the new buds to be used in the tea production process. They are withered and dried at a high temperature. This process completes the production of silver needle loose leaf teas.

The loose tea leaves are then sorted and tied with natural cotton threads to make tea bundles. Each bundle weighs the same and contains leaves of the same length. Herbal flowers are sewn into the bundles, shaped and then dried again at a high temperature to complete the handcrafting process.

The unscented blooming tea pods are wrapped in cheese cloths and then mixed with freshly picked jasmine flowers to go through a complicated scenting process.

They will be dried again at a high temperature, thus removing any remaining impurities. The final tea bulbs then undergo a UV light treatment and are vacuum-sealed immediately after that.

Watch the teaposy farm and factory video to see part of the process.  go to top

What are the employment conditions for the tea farmers/teaposy assemblers?
The employees of the blooming tea factory are mostly wives with children going to the school near the factory. They usually come to work after they have sent the kids to school, and they do not have a fixed work schedule. They can simply come and go. When it's time for them to prepare lunch or dinner, or there are chores to run, they leave. They really like to come to the factory, even after dinner because they can socialize with the other women during work while earning extra income for the family.

In 2007, we were audited by the CSCC (labor and safety consultation organization) to ensure that we were in compliance with the Costco Code of Conduct.  go to top

Is blooming tea a traditional part of ancient eastern cultures?
No, it is not. It started in China in about 1995. Our partner tea farm/factory hand-tied some silver needle tea leaves and a plum flower with cotton thread. That was the first blooming tea on the market from our tea farm. There is another tea farm in a different region of China that produces a type of green tea called Mao Feng. They also said that they invented blooming teas. Nobody really knows who made the very first blooming tea, but each different design does have a patented owner. Our tea factory holds 8 blooming tea design patterns.  go to top